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Leonardo Group Americas

Lean Design Specialists

Applying Lean Industrial Engineering principles to design the world's most efficient factories and hospitals.

Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Healthcare
Healthcare
Lean Design Studio
Lean Design Studio

Leonardo Group Americas

Lean Design Specialists

Applying Lean Industrial Engineering principles to design the world's most efficient factories and hospitals.

Manufacturing

Healthcare

Lean Design Studio

What is Lean?

Lean is a culture. More specifically, Lean is a culture of continuous improvement where everybody contributes to the improvement of processes and value streams. We cannot emphasize this enough: EVERYBODY should be involved in Lean, not just the green belts, black belts, and super-duper-my-belt-is-nicer-than-yours belts. EVERYBODY. 
 
Imagine a future where all staff members (1000? 2000? Over 10,000 for some of you?) make one suggestion per month and it is implemented. Can you imagine the power of that? No performance excellence department alone could ever do that. Not even with a staff of 100 consultants.

The more you do continuous improvement, the more it becomes a part of your company culture.

What is the difference between
Lean and Lean Design?

The philosophy of continuous improvement is prevalent in Lean Design. The difference is that Lean Design takes it a step further, using that same Lean philosophy in order to take action. Lean Design is a step-by-step methodology that you can follow in order to improve a physical space.

That physical space could be a factory or a hospital. It goes without saying that the goals and therefore the steps for these spaces are different. However, the underlying philosophy is the same:

Eliminate waste

Eliminate waste

Eliminate errors

Eliminate errors

Continuously improve

Continuously improve

At Leonardo Group Americas, our Lean Design methodology is based on the scientific method and rooted in Lean Industrial Engineering. The steps have been proven over many successful implementations world-wide, over many decades.

Staff development is also a critical aspect of the Lean Design process, as only an engaged staff can propel your Lean efforts towards perfection. Without an engaged staff, improvements will not be sustained. Let's be clear: our goal is not to make you consulting junkies! We offer a wide variety of training options so that you can master the Lean Design methodology for yourself.

Our Lean Design programs are separated into two distinct groups:

Lean Design in Manufacturing

The goal of Lean Design is to arrange a production line as a series of sequential workstations so that you can build a product progressively. By arranging workstations to work progressively, flow lines facilitate the implementation of quality steps that double check critical product features.

The term we use to describe this type of production is "Mixed Model". Designing a Mixed Model production lines allows you to link and balance your processes, which eliminates waiting time and allows your materials to flow. The benefits of designing a Mixed Model production line include:

Reduced customer response time

Reduced customer response time

Shortened Manufacturing Cycle Time

Shortened Manufacturing Cycle Time

Less floor space is required

Less floor space is required

Quality is improved

Quality is improved

Flexibility increases

Flexibility increases

Less Working Capital is required

Less Working Capital is required

It is common to see Manufacturing Cycle Time improvements of 70% or 80% or even 90% when a manufacturer switches from traditional batch scheduling to a Mixed Model methodology.

How does Mixed Model production work?

A Mixed Model production line is designed to build a family of products using the same manufacturing resources. The advantages of mixing products in one line are many including the capacity to absorb swings in customer demand.
 
A Mixed Model line requires planning or scheduling to build product, but that function takes place at the line level, rather than at the individual resource level. Products flow from process to process without interruptions, accumulating standard work toward their point of completion.

Lean Design Training Options
for Manufacturing Professionals

Leonardo Group Americas offers a variety of training options for all scopes of business and Lean maturity. We have worked with everyone from local manufacturers and consultants to Fortune 100 clients.

Lean Design Studio

The Lean Design Studio is a membership site that gives you access to all of our online training courses, Mixed Model implementation checklists, Mastermind forum, as well as an easy-to-use Lean Design Simulator for modeling your Mixed Model production line designs BEFORE implementation. 

Membership to the Lean Design Studio is available for only $47 a month. You can try it now for $1 for your first month.

Find Out More

3-day Workshops at Toyota Material Handling

Each quarter we host a public workshop at Toyota Material Handling in Columbus, Indiana. Workshops alternate between Mixed Model Line Design and Mixed Model Material Flow. If you are curious about our Lean Design methodology, these workshops offer an excellent insight into how our philosophy can be successfully applied in a world-class manufacturing environment. Plant tours and Q&As with Toyota managers are included.

Choose a Workshop

The Complete Guide to Mixed Model Line Design Book

Written by Leonardo Group Americas' founders Richard Rahn and Gerard Leone, The Complete Guide to Mixed Model Line Design is the definitive record of all things Mixed Model manufacturing.

Start Reading

Consulting

Prefer private training or consulting? Leonardo Group Americas offers both options. Our clients include some of the biggest names in industry. You can read more about our approach to Lean Industrial Engineering by clicking the link below:

Learn more about our methodology

Lean Design for Healthcare

Let's start by emphasizing the focus of our improvement efforts in a Lean Hospital environment: patient safety, patient satisfaction, and treatment outcomes. How do you do all that? Through the elimination of waste, the elimination of errors, and a relentless focus on patient flow.

Lean matters to a hospital because at the center of it is the elimination of wasteful activities that prevent clinicians from doing what they were trained to do: to take care of patients. The reality is that a large percentage of what you do every day does not add value to patients.

Why is Patient Flow Important?

Every time you go into a supply room looking for an endomechanical staple that is not there, forcing you to make a call to the basement and wait; every time you need a debakey and have to open another instrument set to get it; every time you go to get your patient and the H&P is not ready, time goes down the drain. That is time you do not get back and that should have been devoted to patient care.

Your main goal is to enable clinicians to deliver more patient care by eliminating the obstacles (the wasteful activities) that prevent them from doing so. The harsh reality is that a staggering amount of work is wasted in broken processes and all that time can never be recovered. It is gone. 70% or 80% waste is possible.

Lean Design Training Options
for Healthcare Professionals

Leonardo Group Americas has created a selection of Lean Design programs specifically for reaching your goal of a Lean Hospital.

Lean Hospital Design Program

This program follows our trademark Lean Hospital Roadmap approach to designing a Lean Hospital. The Lean Hospital Design program was created to help hospitals reduced space requirements, improved on-time operating room starts, reduce inventory of medical supplies, shorten response times to emergencies, and improve the general quality of care.

How it works

Online Courses for Lean Hospital

We offer several, affordably priced online courses, complete with quizzes and final exams so that you can learn Lean Design for Hospitals from anywhere. Topics include: Introduction to the Lean Hospital, Roadmap for the Lean Hospital, and Value Stream Mapping in the OR.

Browse Online Course Catalog

Lean Hospital Books

Leonardo Group Americas' founders, Gerard Leone and Richard Rahn, have combined to publish six different books concerning the Lean Hospital. Our books are available on Amazon. Choose from the titles below:

Lean Training Games in the OR

Lean Training Games in the OR

Just about everyone learns best by doing. A pilot, for example, needs to complete some classroom work, but much of the training will take place in the air and at the controls of a plane. This is good, but also time and fuel consuming, and a potentially risky use of an expensive resource, the plane. For that reason and more, commercial pilots log time in a flight simulator. While the simulator is not identical to actual flight, it is a valuable and much cheaper substitute for flight time. Dangerous procedures can be practiced over and over in a simulator, without putting the pilot and the hardware at risk, until the pilot response becomes “muscle memory”.

Lean in the OR

Lean in the OR

There are only two kinds of hospitals today: those who are pursuing the creation of a Lean Hospital culture, and those who will. This easy-to-read book covers some of the main elements of a Lean Hospital initiative, including the concept of waste as it applies to the OR, the glaring weaknesses of the Par Level method of supplies management (and an alternative), the Lean system of Quick Changeover in the OR, the importance of standardization using simple tools like checklists, and the central goal of staff engagement and idea generation in the never-ending work of continuous improvement.

Quick Changeover in the OR

Quick Changeover in the OR

Most hospitals across the United States are feeling the financial pressures. There never seem to be enough resources to deliver as much care as required by the community and with the quality the hospital considers the community deserves. Staff members and administrators stretch themselves to the max to take care of all the patients that require care. The gravity of the situation is all the more evident in the Perioperative Services Department. This is a department that uses more resources than any other place in the hospital. The resources used in the Perioperative Services Department are some of the most expensive in the entire hospital, making the financial pressures even more critical.

Roadmap for the Lean Hospital

Roadmap for the Lean Hospital

This book is an introduction to Lean principles and tools as they apply to hospitals and healthcare organizations. We are at a tipping point for hospitals in the US and around the world. Competition is beginning to be a meaningful market force, when it was not a short time ago. Pressure on costs is being brought to the forefront, and usually not in the way we would like. Often staff appears to be the target for cost reductions, rather than the many forms of waste that plague the hospital. Government programs and hospital support are undergoing scrutiny, and the ability of society to support rapidly rising healthcare costs is being questioned.

Supplies Management in the OR

Supplies Management in the OR

It is rare but gratifying to come across an improvement opportunity that is large, easy to understand and demonstrate, and apparently universally needed in ORs and hospital operations in general: improvement in supplies management. If you have spent your career exclusively within hospitals, it may be hard to appreciate how dysfunctional the common practice of “Par Level” supplies management really is, or how other businesses would not even consider such a practice. For American hospitals alone, the amount of waste, i.e. work that is not really needed or that could be easily eliminated, related to supplies management boggles the mind and may total not millions but billions of dollars each year. We don’t expect you to take our word for it, however, and in the introductory chapters we’ll provide you with the tools to demonstrate the benefits for yourself.

Value Stream Mapping in the OR

Value Stream Mapping in the OR

Value Stream Mapping is a necessary Lean tool, and the basis for an improvement plan in the OR and throughout the hospital. This book guides you through the process of creating a Value Stream Map.

Upon completing this book, staff will be well equipped to participate in Value Stream Mapping projects based on Lean principles. One of the first steps in a Lean initiative is the development of several Value Stream Maps, flowcharts that document all of the processes required to deliver a product or service from start to finish. A hospital will have many different value streams that will need to be developed, including the work done in the OR. The course discusses the steps to creating a Current State map, a Future State map, and a Master Plan to achieve the future state.